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  Thursday, May 28, 2015  Home > Living > Animals & Pets
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  • Elephant numbers plunge in Mozambique because of poachers 28 May 2015 | 8:43 am

    In this photo taken Sept. 6, 2014, provided byt by Wildlife Conservation Society a poached elephant lays in the Mozambican bush after been shot dead by poacher gunfire. Poachers slaughtering elephants in Mozambique cut their population almost in half from 2009 to last year, but in Uganda, elephant numbers are increasing as a result of anti-poaching measures, according to aerial surveys. (Alastair Nelson/Wildlife Conservation Society via AP)JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Poachers slaughtering elephants in Mozambique cut their population almost in half from 2009 to last year, but in Uganda, elephant numbers are increasing as a result of anti-poaching measures, according to aerial surveys.


  • Animal rights group asks New York judge to free research chimps 27 May 2015 | 4:01 pm

    Animal rights activist Wayne Johnson holds a sign outside New York State Supreme Court in the Manhattan borough of New YorkBy Alice Popovici NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. animal-rights advocates on Wednesday called on a New York court to order a state university to release two adult chimpanzee research subjects, contending that their captivity amounts to unlawful imprisonment. The Nonhuman Rights Project argued before a New York State Supreme Court acting justice that the chimpanzees, named Hercules and Leo, are entitled to legal protection, noting that the species has demonstrated language skills and the ability to pass on culture to younger generations. "They're self-conscious," said Steven Wise, president of the group, which has sued Stony Brook University, located about 50 miles (80 km) east of New York City, seeking the chimps' release.


  • Tally of oil-soaked wildlife, alive and dead, mounts in California 23 May 2015 | 8:42 am

    By Steve Gorman and Alan Devall LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - The carcasses of five petroleum-soaked pelicans have been recovered from California's Santa Barbara coastline, the first apparent sea bird fatalities stemming from the oil spill to be documented by officials overseeing the disaster response. The tally was reported Friday by the joint-agency command for cleanup and recovery operations in Santa Barbara and Dr. Michael Ziccardi, a veterinarian from the University of California, Davis, who heads the Oiled Wildlife Care Network. The body of a dolphin with no visible signs of oil also turned up on Friday in Santa Barbara Harbor, though a post-mortem exam must be conducted on the carcasses of the dolphin and birds to determine conclusively whether or not they were victims of the spill.

  • New York attorney general fights group's 'radical' bid to free chimps 22 May 2015 | 4:26 pm

    An animal rights group's "radical attempt" in various lawsuits in New York state to extend legal rights to chimpanzees could undermine ownership of pets and farm animals, the New York attorney general's office said on Friday. The Nonhuman Rights Project, founded by attorney and animal rights activist Steven Wise, has sued Stony Brook University over two chimps it owns, Hercules and Leo, which are used in anatomical research on primates.

  • Dogs domesticated over 27,000 years ago: study 22 May 2015 | 6:05 am

    A woman holds a Husky puppy during an exhibition in Kyrgyzstan's capital BishkekMan's best friend may have been his companion for far longer than believed, scientists have reported, publishing an analysis that dates domesticated dogs to more than 27,000 years ago. The Taimyr wolf lived a few thousand years after Neanderthals disappeared and modern humans spread throughout Asia and Europe, the study said.


  • Air France to continue transporting lab monkeys 21 May 2015 | 4:18 pm

    Two members of PETA in a cage demonstrate against Air France to denounce the transport of primates to laboratories, on May 21, 2015 in ParisAir France will continue to transport live monkeys for laboratory testing, the airline's CEO Alexandre de Juniac said at an Air-France-KLM shareholders' meeting held as animal rights activists protested nearby. At the protest some of the around 30 activists donned monkey costumes and locked themselves up in a cage. Challenged on the issue by a member of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), Juniac said his company has sought advice from experts who believe "experimenting on primates with a similar genetic ancestry to human beings is indispensable" to research.


  • North Carolina preserves New Years Eve opossum tradition 21 May 2015 | 4:09 pm

    By Marti Maguire RALEIGH, N.C. (Reuters) - North Carolina is poised to adopt its third law in as many years aimed at ensuring a rural community can continue to drop a live opossum to ring in the New Year. A bill that would exempt the opossum, a cat-sized marsupial, from state wildlife protections from Dec. 29 to Jan. 2 passed the state senate by a wide margin Thursday after earning house approval in April. The exemption is meant to thwart legal challenges brought by animal welfare advocates who say Brasstown's New Year's Eve tradition is cruel. For decades, the community has lowered an opossum in a Plexiglas box from the roof of the general store, imitating the annual ball drop in New York City.

  • Canada's CTV Acquires CBS 'Zoo' Drama For Summer Run 21 May 2015 | 12:19 pm

    The deal with CBS Television Studios is the first to emerge as the Canucks wrap up deal-making at the Los Angeles Screenings.

  • BP oil spill caused dolphins' lung disease, deaths: study 21 May 2015 | 10:29 am

    Dolphins swimming in the oil-contaminated waters of the Gulf of Mexico after the 2010 BP spill suffered unusual lung lesions and died at high rates because of petroleum pollution, US scientists saidDolphins swimming in the oil-contaminated waters of the Gulf of Mexico after the 2010 BP spill suffered unusual lung lesions and died at high rates because of petroleum pollution, US scientists said Wednesday. The report in the journal PLOS ONE presents the strongest evidence to date that the environmental disaster that was unleashed when the BP-leased Deepwater Horizon rig exploded on April 20, 2010, pouring millions of barrels of oil into the sea, was the reason for an unusually high number of dead or dying bottlenose dolphins washing up on the shores of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. Dolphins take big, deep breaths right at the surface of the water, where oil sheens are most concentrated, and "where there is a good chance of inhaling oil itself," said lead author Stephanie Venn-Watson, a veterinary epidemiologist at the National Marine Mammal Foundation.


  • Japan aquariums say they'll stop getting Taiji-hunt dolphins 20 May 2015 | 9:17 pm

    FILE - In this photo Aug. 15, 2010 file photo, Shiro, a Risso's dolphin, jumps in front of holidaymakers in a small ocean cove in Taiji, Wakayama Prefecture (state), western Japan. Japan's aquariums promised Wednesday, May 20, 2015 to stop acquiring dolphins captured in a bloody hunt in Taiji that was depicted in the Oscar-winning documentary "The Cove" and has caused global outrage. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara, File)TOKYO (AP) — Japan's aquariums have promised to stop acquiring dolphins captured in a bloody hunt that was depicted in the Oscar-winning documentary "The Cove" and caused global outrage.