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  Monday, May 30, 2016  Home > Education > Early Childhood > Mr. Rogers and his impact to PBS funding
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Mr. Rogers and his impact to PBS funding

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Kathleen Tehrani

Mr._RogersThere is a website that I discovered recently and return to consistently now: Reggio Inspired. I return to it because it is one of the most thoughtful, intellectual, and pragmatic early childhood places I have heretofore found. This is a place where teachers of young children are free to brainstorm with other early childhood professionals regarding "out of the box" concepts...which is basically the whole premise of Reggio. (Parents will enjoy a peek into the Reggio Emilia world from the teaching professional's point of view as well, I'm sure.)

On my latest trip to Reggio Inspired, I came upon this video gem, posted by one of the members. As I watched the soul warming essence of Mr. Fred Rogers I was simultaneously bombarded with grief and with joy. Grief that our world no longer contains this individuated soul, and joy that in such a short lifetime...so many were touched so deeply, and profoundly changed at a root level.

It was part of Mr. Roger's genetic makeup to be an advocate for the very young child. I do not believe that anyone has ever been able to see through the eyes of a child as throughly as he. In 1969, Fred Rogers appeared before the United States Senate Subcommittee on Communications. His goal was to support funding for PBS and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, in response to significant proposed cuts by President Nixon. I trust you will share in my appreciation of his intelligence, thoughtfulness,empathy and strength, as he attempts to retain funding for PBS which was in jeopardy. Click on this link to view the video.


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