The Omni Intelligencer

Sell your house faster for more. auction-style-property-sale
  Thursday, May 05, 2016  Home > Education > K-12 & Children > Comics? Big Deal!
Follow us on Twitter
Every Dollar Helps
Donate using PayPal
Amount:

Comics? Big Deal!

| More
Michael Leventhal

I came across Byron Preiss in an old newspaper article.   He wanted to use comic books to teach kids how to read.  I wanted to learn more about him. so I started an Internet search for a man who built a publishing empire from a comic book and a dream 

Preiss-_article.tiff-2

“In 1971, while Preiss was teaching at a Philadelphia elementary school, he conceived and with Jim Steranko produced an anti-drug comic book, The Block, designed for low-level reading skills. Published by Steranko's company, Supergraphics, it was distributed to schools nationwide.”

Jim Steranko , life-long friend and collaborator said:

"For more than three decades, he (Byron) spearheaded a multiplicity of mediaforms, from comics and ebooks to electronic games and CD-ROMs, that fused words and images like few other individuals would achieve in the entertainment arts. As an author, he generated dozens of books, from hard science and history volumes to profusely illustrated children's literature. As a packager, he produced a stream of quality fiction and nonfiction titles for almost every primary publishing house... Preiss was a subtle, yet seminal force in contemporary popular culture and specifically in the evolution of narrative illustration"  

Byron Preiss Presentation


Sell your house faster for more. auction-style-property-sale
| More
 
  • Michigan House passes $500M Detroit schools restructure plan 5 May 2016 | 6:28 am

    Teachers rally outside the school district's headquarters, Tuesday, May 3, 2016, in Detroit. Nearly all of Detroit's public schools were closed for a second consecutive day Tuesday after hundreds of teachers called out sick over concerns that many may not get paid if the financially struggling district runs out of money. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)LANSING, Mich. (AP) — The Michigan House approved a $500 million restructuring plan for Detroit Public Schools early Thursday, just days after disillusioned teachers staged a two-day sick-out because they feared the financially struggling district wouldn't be able to pay them all through the summer.


  • Detroit teachers ending 2-day sick-out, fighting legislation 4 May 2016 | 10:39 pm

    Teachers rally outside the school district's headquarters, Tuesday, May 3, 2016,m in Detroit. Nearly all of Detroit's public schools were closed for a second consecutive day Tuesday after hundreds of teachers called out sick over concerns that many may not get paid if the financially struggling district runs out of money. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)DETROIT (AP) — Detroit schools reopened Wednesday after teachers who had called out sick for two days received assurances from the financially struggling district that they would continue to be paid.


  • Chicago teachers sidestep strike date, tout $502 million funding plan 4 May 2016 | 10:26 pm

    The Chicago Teachers Union withheld the threat on Wednesday of imminent strike action, instead floating a $502 million revenue package as part of a “self-help” plan to stabilize finances in the United State's third largest school system. The revenue plan, which Mayor Rahm Emanuel's office and school administrators criticized, emerged as the union made clear its members would not walk off their jobs on May 16th over stalled contract negotiations. “We have identified half a billion dollars that can triage the bleeding at CPS,” CTU Vice President Jesse Sharkey said in a statement.

  • Chicago Teachers Union decides against taking strike vote 4 May 2016 | 8:21 pm

    CHICAGO (AP) — The Chicago Teachers Union has decided against striking over the lack of a contract, for now.

  • Families sue Illinois school district over transgender bathroom case 4 May 2016 | 5:27 pm

    Dozens of families on Wednesday sued two federal agencies and a suburban Chicago school district over a policy they said disregards student privacy and safety by allowing transgender students to use bathrooms that correspond with their gender identity. Fifty-one families in the Palatine, Illinois, area sued the U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. Justice Department and Township High School District 211 for agreeing last December to provide a changing area in the girls' locker room for transgender students.

  • Set the date! Google I/O runs from May 18-20 in Mountain View, California 4 May 2016 | 4:24 pm

    Set the date! Google I/O runs from May 18-20 in Mountain View, CaliforniaThe official Google I/O app has been updated to reflect the upcoming developer conference at the Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, California from May 18 to May 20. The annual event is a place for Google to unleash all of its software and service announcements, but it also allows developers to get in touch with the creator of the biggest search engine and mobile operating system. Google CEO Sundar Pichai announced the dates on Twitter in January, and the Web page went live in March. Now with the app updated for the 2016 conference, it makes it easier for attendees to schedule and plan what sessions they want to attend on the go. The schedule has been available on the Google I/O website for a few weeks. The app has an interactive map you can use to help you get around, if you’re lucky enough to be attending. You can also get reminders before events start, and will further be able to live stream the keynote and certain sessions. With just weeks away, the app update will do nothing but fuel the hype for what’s to come at the developer conference. You can download the app from the Google Play Store. Registration ended on March 10, but not just anyone can go to these conferences, as general admission tickets are $900. You could have purchased an academic ticket for $300 if qualified as an “active full-time student, professor, faculty or staff at a high school or higher education institution.” The venue is a change in scenery for Google, which has used the Moscone Center for all of its I/O events since it started the annual conference. The Shoreline Amphitheatre is an outdoor venue with the capacity for 22,500 attendees, so let’s hope it doesn’t rain. I/O'16 coming to neighborhood where it all started 10 yrs ago: Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, May 18-20. More details soon. #io16 — sundarpichai (@sundarpichai) January 12, 2016 The outdoor venue does raise some questions, such as the possibility of a Project Wing or Project Loon demo. The company’s self-driving car division might also be on site to answer questions and give people a driverless tour of the venue, possibly revealing the self-driving taxi that was rumored a few months ago. Related:  Google’s Project Zero chastised Trend Micro over security vulnerability “Shoreline Amphitheatre” by Coolcaesar Coolcaesar/Wikipedia Commons The past year has been exciting for Google, as the company went through a major restructuring. Sundar Pichai went from head of services to head of the entire company, with co-founder and head honcho Larry Page moving to chief executive of Alphabet, the parent holding company. We aren’t sure if Google I/O will be all about Google or all about Alphabet. Google only covers Android, Gmail, Search, and a few other key services now, with most of the Google X operations turned into separate divisions inside the Alphabet umbrella. In the past two years, I/O has become more about software and developers, and less about new hardware and moonshots. Only time will tell what this year holds. Updates: Updated on 05-04-2016 by Julian Chokkattu:  Added news that the Google I/O app has been updated for 2016. Updated on 03-08-2016 by Malarie Gokey:  Added news that registration is open.  Updated on 03/01/2016 by Julian Chokkattu:  Added in more details on registration dates for Google’s event. 


  • Is Taxing Harvard, Yale and Stanford the Answer to Rising College Costs? 4 May 2016 | 2:47 pm

    Lawmakers have a new solution for the high cost of college: Make the wealthiest universities pay for it. State and federal policy makers now want to tax those profits—or force the wealthiest schools to spend down their endowments—to defray soaring student bills and refill depleted higher-education budgets. “College costs have outpaced health-care inflation, and at the same time, there’s this benefit for endowments,” said Rep. Peter Roskam (R., Ill.), chairman of the House Ways and Means Subcommittee on Oversight, complaining in an interview about the funds’ tax-free status.

  • Chicago mayor vows fiscal fix before muni audience 4 May 2016 | 12:29 pm

    Chicago Mayor Emaunel Emanuel in a panel at the U.S. Conference of Mayors in WashingtonChicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel tried to reassure municipal credit analysts on Wednesday that the city and its public school district are not falling into a financial abyss. "I will not rest until we fix the fiscal position of both the city and (Chicago Public Schools)," the mayor told the National Federation of Municipal Analysts annual conference. The battle between Illinois' Republican governor, Bruce Rauner, and Democrats who control the legislature has left the state without a fiscal 2016 budget and has stymied Chicago's efforts to seek pension relief.


  • Eyewitness News anchors, reporters remember their favorite teachers 4 May 2016 | 9:11 am

    Eyewitness News anchors, reporters remember their favorite teachersTo honor Teacher Appreciation Week, our Eyewitness News anchors, reporters remember their favorite teachers


  • 'Payback Playbook' Among New Web Tools for Student Loan Borrowers 4 May 2016 | 8:00 am

    The move is a part of the Department of Education's initiative to enroll an additional 2 million student loan borrowers into a repayment plan such Pay As You Earn and other income-based repayment plans. Around 70 percent of student borrowers who are in default would qualify for one of the available income-based repayment plans, according to the U.S. Government Accountability Office. For federal Stafford, PLUS and consolidation loans, collection costs can run as high as 24 percent unless the borrower consolidates out of default and rehabilitates the loans.

The fastest and best way to sell real estate.
auction-style-property-sale