The Omni Intelligencer

Sell your house faster for more. auction-style-property-sale
  Sunday, November 29, 2015  Home > Education > K-12 & Children > Comics? Big Deal!
Follow us on Twitter
Every Dollar Helps
Donate using PayPal

Comics? Big Deal!

| More
Michael Leventhal

I came across Byron Preiss in an old newspaper article.   He wanted to use comic books to teach kids how to read.  I wanted to learn more about him. so I started an Internet search for a man who built a publishing empire from a comic book and a dream 


“In 1971, while Preiss was teaching at a Philadelphia elementary school, he conceived and with Jim Steranko produced an anti-drug comic book, The Block, designed for low-level reading skills. Published by Steranko's company, Supergraphics, it was distributed to schools nationwide.”

Jim Steranko , life-long friend and collaborator said:

"For more than three decades, he (Byron) spearheaded a multiplicity of mediaforms, from comics and ebooks to electronic games and CD-ROMs, that fused words and images like few other individuals would achieve in the entertainment arts. As an author, he generated dozens of books, from hard science and history volumes to profusely illustrated children's literature. As a packager, he produced a stream of quality fiction and nonfiction titles for almost every primary publishing house... Preiss was a subtle, yet seminal force in contemporary popular culture and specifically in the evolution of narrative illustration"  

Byron Preiss Presentation

Sell your house faster for more. auction-style-property-sale
| More
  • Kids making oral history with StoryCorps holiday project 27 Nov 2015 | 3:05 pm

    Rhiannon Leonard interviews her boss, Gary Himes, Friday, Nov. 27, 2015, in Weverton, Md., for StoryCorps' Great Thanksgiving Listen oral history project. High school students across the United States were asked to interview an elder and send the audio recording to a publIcly accessible Library of Congress archive. (AP Photo/David Dishneau)High school students across the country are making oral history this week by recording interviews with their elders in an unprecedented effort to stockpile wisdom for the ages.

  • President's oldest daughter among those scoping out colleges 27 Nov 2015 | 2:40 am

    In this photo taken Aug. 19, 2014, President Barack Obama walks with his daughter Malia on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington toward Marine One. Malia is among the millions of U.S. high school seniors who are nervously taking standardized tests, completing college admissions applications, filling out financial aid forms and writing personal essays, all on deadline, before spending the coming months anxiously waiting to find out if they got into their dream school. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)WASHINGTON (AP) — Michelle Obama's message for high school seniors fretting about their college prospects is simple.

  • Bob Saget Says Mentor Bill Cosby "Has Been Tarnished" 24 Nov 2015 | 11:00 pm

    "It's an area I don't usually delve into, but you're a very brave woman. And I brought a briefcase of pills to give to you," Saget joked in response to a fan's question.

  • Washington state girl, 16, found tied up in high school bathroom 24 Nov 2015 | 5:59 pm

    A 16-year-old girl in Washington state was physically assaulted on Tuesday and tied up in a bathroom at her Seattle high school, law enforcement and school officials said. The victim said two females assaulted her, tied her up and left her in the bathroom in an early morning incident at Highline Public Schools' Evergreen Campus, King County Sheriff's Office spokeswoman Cindi West said.

  • 10 Colleges Where Applying Early Increases the Chances of Getting In 24 Nov 2015 | 8:00 am

    The U.S. News Short List, separate from our overall rankings, is a regular series that magnifies individual data points in hopes of providing students and parents a way to find which undergraduate or graduate programs excel or have room to grow in specific areas. Be sure to explore The Short List: College, The Short List: Grad School and The Short List: Online Programs to find data that matter to you in your college or grad school search.

  • Teachers save 12-year-old girl who collapsed in cardiac arrest at Long Island school 23 Nov 2015 | 5:30 pm

    Teachers save 12-year-old girl who collapsed in cardiac arrest at Long Island schoolTwelve-year-old Jessica Lemus was in class at Wisdom Lane Middle School in Levittown when she suddenly collapsed. It took three shocks from an AED to bring her back.

  • Wolf: Deal to end 5-month budget stalemate in 'deep peril' 23 Nov 2015 | 3:28 pm

    Wolf: Deal to end 5-month budget stalemate in 'deep peril'Gov. Tom Wolf and Republican lawmakers appeared unable to bridge a divide Monday over how to slash school property taxes as part of a broader agreement to end a five-month budget stalemate that has left public schools and social services without billions in state aid.

  • Money Minute: Why college graduates dread November 23 Nov 2015 | 1:31 pm

    If you graduated from college in May, your 6-month student loan grace period officially ends right about now.

  • Pesticide-makers point to other culprits in bee die-offs 23 Nov 2015 | 8:20 am

    Sarah Myers, right, a manager at the Bayer North American Bee Care Center, shows a tray of bees to St. Thomas More Academy student Maria Pompi, left, during a tour of the center in Research Triangle Park, N.C., Tuesday, Sep. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Ted Richardson)RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, North Carolina (AP) — In a Nordic-inspired building tucked in a corner of the Bayer CropScience North American headquarters, high school students wander through 6,000 square feet (more than 550 square meters) dedicated entirely to the specialness of bees. Children taste different types of honey and examine the differences between honeybee and carpenter bee specimens.

  • Massachusetts abandons Common Core tests, but impact's here to stay 22 Nov 2015 | 2:58 pm

    The Massachusetts State Board of Education has voted to forego Common Core testing in favor of redesigning its own state exam, an influential move from a national education leader that may hasten the end of a national high-stakes testing era, while challenging education experts to come up with a better alternative. Under intense pressure from both the right and left of the political spectrum, states have been practically tripping over each other to drop the controversial tests: Parents complained they were too hard, conservatives alleged they represented a federal takeover, and teachers' unions decried test score-based teacher evaluations.

The fastest and best way to sell real estate.