The Omni Intelligencer

Sell your house faster for more. auction-style-property-sale
  Wednesday, June 29, 2016  Home > Body-Mind-Spirit > Health & Wellness > Diabetes > Diabetic's Beware!
Follow us on Twitter
Every Dollar Helps
Donate using PayPal
Amount:

Diabetic's Beware!

| More
Dr. Nelson Mañé

Metformin is a medication commonly prescribed for type two diabetics. Metformin is also sold as Glucophage, Fortamet, and Glumetza. A recent study in the scientific research journal of the Brazilian medical association found a high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in Metformin treated diabetic patients.

Vitamin B12 is a water soluble vitamin that is naturally present in foods such as fish, shellfish, poultry, milk, eggs and meat.   Vitamin B12 is necessary proper function of your nervous system, the manufacture of red blood cells as well as to make DNA.  Vitamin B12 is also associated with regulating Homocysteine levels which is associated with heart disease.

Symptoms associated with vitamin B12 deficiency include:

  • diabetes_1confusion 
  • forgetfulness
  • feeling tired and weak
  • tingling in the hands and feet 
  • constipation
  • trouble with balance and walking
  • mood changes including depression
  • weight loss.
Physical signs you may notice include:
  • soreness of the tongue
  • bleeding gums
  • frequent bruising
  • paleness of the skin.

Vitamin B12 levels are typically evaluated by serum or plasma analysis. This type of testing can be performed at any of your standard laboratories such as Quest Diagnostics and as such are readily available to patients in the United States .

Ten to thirty percent of those over 50 years of age suffer from a condition called atrophic gastritis.  In atrophic gastritis, there are reduced levels of hydrochloric acid produced by the stomach.  The consequence of this low hydrochloric acid production is diminished absorption of vitamin B12. Thus, if you are elderly and a diabetic taking metformin, the chances of your having a vitamin B12 deficiency increase.

Vegetarians, who by definition do not eat animal proteins, and are the most prevalent source of vitamin B12, and those with digestive disorders such as crohn's disease, also need to beware of possible B12 deficiency. Once again, this is especially true if coupled with being a diabetic was taking metformin.

If you're a diabetic and taking Metformin and feel that several of the signs and symptoms listed above pertain to you, contact your physician for a vitamin B12 analysis. Many physicians are not aware of the nutritional consequences of the medication they prescribe and therefore a visit to a functional medicine practitioner may be in order.


Sell your house faster for more. auction-style-property-sale
| More
 
  • Regulator probing Canon on $6.5 billion Toshiba unit purchase: source 29 Jun 2016 | 10:13 pm

    People are silhouetted against a display of the Canon brand logo at the CP+ camera and photo trade fair in YokohamaJapan's anti-monopoly regulator is investigating Canon Inc over a possible breach of disclosure rules in the company's acquisition of Toshiba Corp's medical equipment unit, a source with direct knowledge of the matter said. Canon, which agreed in mid-March to buy Toshiba Medical for 665.5 billion yen ($6.5 billion), declined to comment on the matter. Toshiba, in a hurry to raise cash before closing its books for the business year that ended in March, structured the sale of its medical equipment business to Canon in an unorthodox way so that it could book proceeds before the deal was approved by regulators.


  • 'Come home and help', urges Central African Republic doctor 29 Jun 2016 | 7:08 pm

    By Paula Dear BANGUI (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - When violence erupted in the Central African Republic three years ago, hundreds of thousands of people fled the capital Bangui, including most doctors and medical students at the main children's hospital. As the city descended into chaos, 58-year-old Jean Gody was one of the few doctors who chose to stay behind and help. "I would have been ashamed to leave people suffering and then have to come back and look them in the eyes," the hospital director told the Thomson Reuters Foundation in an interview.

  • Children face 'staggeringly high' hunger in conflict-hit Central African Republic 29 Jun 2016 | 7:05 pm

    By Paula Dear BANGUI (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Clinging to her toy dog, 18-month-old Clemence Mokbem stares ahead as nurses rush past to tend to crying babies in the hot, overcrowded intensive care ward in a Bangui hospital. The toddler was taken to the main children's hospital in Central African Republic's capital by her teenage mother Anita, after successive bouts of malaria led to fever and weight loss. "I fed her but she didn't eat - she cried all night," the 16-year-old told the Thomson Reuters Foundation at the hospital.

  • Health officials prepare for Zika, but local efforts tight 29 Jun 2016 | 6:42 pm

    In this photo taken June 22, 2016, a pile of tires sits in a neighborhood near downtown Houston. Trash piles like this are textbook habitat for the mosquitoes that carry Zika, and one example of the challenge facing public health officials. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)HOUSTON (AP) — The poorest parts of Houston remind Dr. Peter Hotez of some of the neighborhoods in Latin America hardest hit by Zika.


  • Finding A Cure Wouldn’t Mean We’ve Defeated Cancer 29 Jun 2016 | 6:04 pm

    Finding A Cure Wouldn’t Mean We’ve Defeated CancerWebMD wasn't a research option when Ivy Brown was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma in 1974, so her mother looked up her 12-year-old daughter's condition the old-fashioned way, in a hardcover medical volume."It just said 'fatal,'" Brown explained. Having moved the family to London a month earlier, Brown's parents were still trying to liaise...


  • New Zika diagnostics needed for babies, researchers say 29 Jun 2016 | 5:39 pm

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus has been linked to microcephaly -- a shrinking of the brain and skull -- in babiesSome infants with brain abnormalities may not be diagnosed because they have normal-sized heads instead of the tell-tale small skulls of those born with Zika-linked microcephaly, said one of the papers published by The Lancet. This meant that "newborns infected with the virus late in pregnancy may go unreported due to their head size being within normal range," said study co-author Cesar Victora of the Federal University of Pelotas. Benign in most people, the mosquito-borne virus has been linked to microcephaly -- a shrinking of the brain and skull -- in babies, and to rare adult-onset neurological problems such as Guillain-Barre Syndrome, which can result in paralysis and death.


  • Olympics will come and go but Zika is here to stay, scientists say 29 Jun 2016 | 4:16 pm

    By Paulo Prada RIO DE JANEIRO (Reuters) - Battered by a presidential impeachment and the worst recession since the Great Depression, Brazil is getting a rare bit of relief as Rio de Janeiro prepares to host the Olympics: declining numbers of Zika infections. Since the start of the Zika outbreak, which wreaked havoc across Brazil's northeast earlier this year, many physicians and would-be visitors have worried the Games could be a catalyst to spread the virus internationally. Some athletes, including the world's top-ranked golfer, have said they will stay home to avoid infection because of concerns over health complications caused by Zika, notably microcephaly, a birth defect among babies of pregnant mothers infected by the virus.

  • Timeline: Zika's origin and global spread 29 Jun 2016 | 4:16 pm

    The following timeline charts the origin and spread of the Zika virus from its discovery nearly 70 years ago: 1947: Scientists researching yellow fever in Uganda's Zika Forest identify the virus in a rhesus monkey 1948: Virus recovered from Aedes africanus mosquito in Zika Forest 1952: First human cases detected in Uganda and Tanzania 1954: Virus found in Nigeria 1960s-80s: Zika detected in mosquitoes and monkeys across equatorial Africa 1969–83: Zika found in equatorial Asia, including India, Indonesia, Malaysia and Pakistan 2007: Zika spreads from Africa and Asia, first large outbreak on ...

  • Factbox: Why the Zika virus is causing alarm 29 Jun 2016 | 4:16 pm

    Global health officials are racing to better understand the Zika virus behind a major outbreak that began in Brazil last year and has spread to many countries in the Americas. Zika is transmitted to people through the bite of infected female mosquitoes, primarily the Aedes aegypti mosquito, the same type that spreads dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever. The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) said Aedes mosquitoes are found in all countries in the Americas except Canada and continental Chile, and the virus will likely reach all countries and territories of the region where Aedes mosquitoes are found.

  • U.S. women groom their pubic hair, for diverse reasons 29 Jun 2016 | 4:13 pm

    By Andrew M. Seaman Over 80 percent of U.S. women groom their pubic hair, for a wide variety of reasons. While previous studies have found most women groom their hair "down there" - for example, by shaving, waxing or trimming - until now no one had looked at their motivations, said Dr. Tami Rowen, an obstetrician and gynecologist at the University of California, San Francisco. It’s important to understand what drives women to groom their pubic hair, she and her colleagues say in new report.

The fastest and best way to sell real estate.
auction-style-property-sale