The Omni Intelligencer

Sell your house faster for more. auction-style-property-sale
  Tuesday, May 31, 2016  Home > Body-Mind-Spirit > Health & Wellness > Heart > Cholesterol - Criticized for Decades - Now a Nutritional Superhero?
Follow us on Twitter
Every Dollar Helps
Donate using PayPal
Amount:

Cholesterol - Criticized for Decades - Now a Nutritional Superhero?

| More

Dr. Stephanie Seneff is a senior research scientist at MIT where she has been conducting research in computer science for over three decades. She also has an undergraduate degree in biology from MIT, and a minor in food and nutrition. She's affiliated with the Weston A. Price Foundation and will be speaking at their November Dallas conference, and so will I.

I previously published the first summary of this interview, which addressed the importance of sulfur for heart- and cardiovascular health. The issues of cholesterol and sulfur are closely interrelated, and both are also dependent on sun exposure for their effectiveness, as is the vitamin D synthesized in your skin, all of which was addressed in part one.

Here, I will summarize Dr. Seneff's stance on cholesterol, which she believes conventional medicine is seriously confusedabout.

"I always have believed that cholesterol is a very, very important nutrient," she says."Cholesterol is to animals as chlorophyll is to plants. It basically gives us mobility – the ability to move and it gives the nervous system the ability to think."

The Importance of Dietary Cholesterol

About 80-90 percent of the cholesterol in your body is produced by your liver, which has led to the faulty assumption that cholesterol from dietary sources can, and should, be avoided.

"I get very annoyed when I hear this, and we hear it a lot—that your body can make all the cholesterol it needs and therefore you don't need it in your diet," Dr. Seneff says.

"... [I]t's true that your body can synthesize cholesterol, [and that] it's not an essential nutrient like some other things are. However, foods that contain cholesterol contain a lot of other things that are very important to you; that are critical nutrients. Cholesterol is associated for example with choline, and all the fat-soluble vitamins – vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin E, vitamin K, zinc, iron."

Cholesterol is a marker. Meaning, you may not necessarily need the dietary cholesterol itself, but you do need the other micronutrients that are associated with it in the foods that contain them. And you need those micronutrients in conjunction with cholesterol in order for them to be properly digested.

Why Limiting Dietary Cholesterol May Harm Your Health

Dr. Seneff actually believes it's difficult to get "too much" cholesterol in your diet, particularly in the standard American diet. But you may very well be getting too little, and that can cause problems.

For example, 25 percent of the cholesterol in your body is in your brain, even though your brain is only two percent of your body's weight. The cholesterol is absolutely essential for neuron transport, so it's easy to understand why lack of cholesterol can negatively affect your brain function. But impaired memory and dementia are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to low cholesterol's impact on your brain. Having too little of this beneficial compound also:

  • Increases your risk of depression
  • Can cause you to commit suicide
  • May lead to violent behavior and aggression
  • Increase your risk of cancer and Parkinson's disease

Dr. Seneff also points to the research by Weston A. Price; a dentist by profession who traveled all around the world studying the health effects of indigenous diets. Interestingly enough, many indigenous diets are shockingly high in dietary cholesterol based on today's conventional medical standards. Foods like caviar, liver, and the adrenal glands of bears were highly valued in some cultures that also had very low rates of heart disease and other modern diseases.

Dr. Seneff believes, as do I, that placing an upper limit on dietary cholesterol, especially such a LOW upper limit as is now recommended, is likely causing far more harm than good.

See Dr. Stephanie Seneff
and I Speak in November

We are both scheduled to speak at the Weston Price Foundation Conference Nov 11-13th.

Heart Disease May be a Cholesterol Deficiency Problem...

Considering the fact that conventional medicine has been telling us that heart disease is due to elevated cholesterol and recommends lowering cholesterol levels as much as possible, Dr. Seneff's claims may come as a complete shock:

"Heart disease, I think, is a cholesterol deficiency problem, and in particular a cholesterol sulfate deficiency problem...

Through her research, she has developed a theory in which the mechanism we call "cardiovascular disease" (of which arterial plaque is a hallmark) is actually your body's way to compensate for not having enough cholesterol sulfate. To understand how this works, you have to understand the interrelated workings of cholesterol, sulfur, and vitamin D from sun exposure.

Cholesterol sulfate is produced in large amounts in your skin when it is exposed to sunshine. When you are deficient in cholesterol sulfate from lack of sun exposure, your body employs another mechanism to increase it, as it is essential for optimal heart- and brain function. It does this by taking damaged LDL and turning it into plaque. Within the plaque, your blood platelets separate out the beneficial HDL cholesterol, and through a process involving homocysteine as a source of sulfate, the platelets go on to produce the cholesterol sulfate your heart and brain needs. However, this plaque also causes the unfortunate side effect of increasing your risk of cardiovascular disease.

So how do you get out of this detrimental cycle?

Dr. Seneff believes that high serum cholesterol and low serum cholesterol sulfate go hand-in-hand, and that the ideal way to bring down your LDL (so-called "bad" cholesterol, which is associated with cardiovascular disease) is to get appropriate amounts of sunlight exposure on your skin.

She explains:

"In this way, your skin will produce cholesterol sulfate, which will then flow freely through the blood—not packaged up inside LDL—and therefore your liver doesn't have to make so much LDL. So the LDL goes down. In fact... there is a complete inverse relationship between sunlight and cardiovascular disease – the more sunlight, the less cardiovascular disease."

What this also means is that when you artificially lower your cholesterol with a statin drug, which effectively reduces the bioavailability of cholesterol to that plaque but doesn't address the root problem, your body is not able to create the cholesterol sulfate your heart needs anymore, and as a result you end up with acute heart failure.

Cholesterol During Pregnancy

Cholesterol sulfate is also essential for babies in utero. A woman has about 1.5 units of cholesterol sulfate normally in her blood. When she gets pregnant, her blood levels of cholesterol sulfate steadily rise, and it also begins to accumulate in the villi in the placenta—which is where nutrients are transferred from the placenta to the baby. At the end of pregnancy the cholesterol sulfate in the villi rises to levels of about 24 units!

Interestingly enough, when a mother has high serum cholesterol, the baby's levels are typically low. But the child also tends to have fatty deposits in his arteries...despite the fact that fatty deposits are supposed to be associated with high cholesterol.

Why is this? Dr. Seneff explains:

"The deposits are there, I think, to start this cholesterol sulfate program that's replacing the one that isn't happening... Children who have adequate cholesterol sulfate delivered from their mother do not have fatty deposits... It's bizarre, but the high cholesterol associated with fatty deposits in the adult (that's causing heart disease) is a solution, not a cause."

This truly is a complete turnaround in thinking compared to the conventional paradigm! Furthermore:

"The worst thing you can do is to clobber the LDL... because you're going to radically increase your risk of ending up with heart failure," Dr. Seneff says.

How Fructose Consumption Hinders Optimal Cholesterol Function

Your liver can make cholesterol, but it requires effort. As Dr. Seneff points out, it's a complex process involving some 25 to 30-steps. Now, one factor that most people are unaware of is that when your liver is busy processing fructose (which your liver turns into fat), it severely hampers its ability to make cholesterol. This is yet another important facet that explains how and why excessive fructose consumption is so detrimental to your health.

According to Dr. Seneff:

"If you're eating a high fructose diet, which most people in America are, one of the things your liver is going to have to do is to turn that fructose into fat... and it needs cholesterol to store the fat but it can't make cholesterol while it's processing fructose... So when there are high levels of glucose in the blood, your liver is kind of caught in a hard place because it can't make the cholesterol it needs to store the fat that it is producing from the fructose...

I think in many cases, people are facing a cholesterol deficiency because they don't have it in the diet, [and] because the liver is working overtime on other things."

Tying it All Together...

All in all, Dr. Seneff's research makes a very compelling case for the vital importance of getting appropriate sun exposure and avoiding fructose in your diet. To summarize into layman's terms the two inter-related disease processes just described would look something like this:

Lack of sun exposure → cholesterol sulfate deficiency → plaque formation (to produce cholesterol sulfate to protect heart) → cardiovascular disease

And...

High fructose consumption → over-taxed liver → impaired cholesterol formation → cholesterol deficiency → plaque formation to compensate for cholesterol sulfate deficiency → cardiovascular disease

The reversal of this disease process would then look like this:

Appropriate sun exposure + low-sugar diet = optimal cholesterol production in your liver + optimal cholesterol sulfate production in your skin → healthy cholesterol levels and absence of arterial plaque

Source: mercola.com


Sell your house faster for more. auction-style-property-sale
| More
 
  • Doctors credit fitness for helping California woman survive shark attack 31 May 2016 | 5:46 pm

    A woman bitten by a shark off the coast of Southern California suffered a single chomp from her shoulder to her pelvis and survived largely because she was physically fit enough to tread water until she was rescued, doctors said on Tuesday. The victim, identified by medical officials as 52-year-old Maria Korcsmaros, was pulled from the Pacific Ocean by lifeguards on a patrol boat on Sunday about 150 yards (meters) off the shore of Newport Beach after she was seen in distress, said Mary Locey, a spokeswoman for the city. Korcsmaros was training for an Ironman triathlon when she was attacked by the shark on Sunday and doctors have credited her physical fitness for her survival, said Kelsey Eiben, a spokeswoman for Orange County Global Medical Center where the woman is being treated.

  • General Mills recalls flour over possible link to E.coli outbreak 31 May 2016 | 5:36 pm

    The General Mills logo is seen on a box of cereal in Evanston(Reuters) - General Mills Inc on Tuesday issued a voluntary recall of about 10 million pounds of flour, saying it was working with health officials to investigate an outbreak of E. coli that had sickened 38 people in 20 U.S. states. The bacteria strain behind the outbreak has not been found in any of General Mills' Gold Medal, Wondra and Signature Kitchens flour or their manufacturing plant, the company said. "Out of an abundance of caution, a voluntary recall is being made," General Mills said.


  • Better-trained doctors would improve healthcare for trans youths: study 31 May 2016 | 5:19 pm

    A man holds a flag as he takes part in an annual Gay Pride Parade in TorontoBy Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - Pediatricians rarely receive training in gender-affirming health care, and as a result, few transgender youths who are eligible for such healthcare actually receive it, experts say. Transgender people, whose gender does not align with their sex assigned at birth, experience higher rates of anxiety, depression, substance abuse and suicide than other people, the researchers write in the Journal of Adolescent Health. Timely access to gender-affirming healthcare, such as puberty blockers and cross-sex hormones, is tied to improved body image and a lower risk of long term mental health problems, according to Samantha Gridley of the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville and colleagues.


  • Put Your Own Oxygen Mask on FIRST! 31 May 2016 | 3:47 pm

    Put Your Own Oxygen Mask on FIRST!Ever flown in an airplane? At the beginning of the flight, the flight attendants review what to do in an emergency, and they always stress that if the oxygen masks come down, you should put your own mask on before helping anyone else.I always nod wisely when they say that, because of course, if you don't have oxygen, you won't be able to help...


  • Canada to make plain packaging for tobacco products compulsory 31 May 2016 | 3:28 pm

    A high school student looks at a mock up of plain cigarette packaging in OttawaCanada, following the lead of Britain and Australia, will make plain packaging of cigarettes compulsory in a bid to cut the rate of smoking, Health Minister Jane Philpott said on Tuesday. Although Canada already obliges firms to slap large graphic warning labels on cigarette packets, Philpott said more must be done, given that some 5 million of Canada's 36 million inhabitants still use tobacco products. "I don't believe tobacco companies should be allowed to build brand loyalty with children for a product that could kill them," Philpott told reporters.


  • Air pollution tied to high blood pressure risk 31 May 2016 | 3:10 pm

    People walk during a polluted day in ShenyangBy Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - Short and long-term exposure to air pollution from vehicle exhaust or burning coal is associated with high blood pressure, according to a review of 17 studies. “Since the 1990s, a hypothesis of air pollution leading to hypertension risk was proposed by many researchers,” said senior author Tao Liu of the Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention in Guangzhou, China. The researchers analyzed 17 studies of air pollution and hypertension, defined as blood pressure higher than 140/90 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg).


  • Why Striving for Happiness Is Not Selfish 31 May 2016 | 3:08 pm

    Why Striving for Happiness Is Not SelfishHands up if you like cheesy quotes! Something along the lines of "Happiness never goes out of style," or "Don't worry, be happy." They sound and look great on posters, mugs and Pinterest walls, and are usually about passions, following your dreams or doing what makes you happy.But who really follows their advice? Who actually turns their life...


  • 7 Strategies to Make Healthy Habits Stick 31 May 2016 | 3:05 pm

    7 Strategies to Make Healthy Habits StickWe all have that vision in our head of who we'd love to be. Fit, active, free from pain and chronic health conditions, surrounded by supportive and loving people, and engaged in rewarding and purposeful work. But getting from here to there is tough, and you may feel like you've tried just about everything to get there with no results.You're not...


  • Are You Getting Into Your Green Zone? 31 May 2016 | 2:50 pm

    Are You Getting Into Your Green Zone?How much of your day do you feel that your body's in stress vs. recovery mode?Whilst we can have a guestimate ourselves, there is a way to take a more scientific approach via heart rate variability testing. I recently went through three days of this in the form of a Lifestyle assessment followed by a debrief with wellness accountant Gitana...


  • New Zealand, Norway back plain packets for cigarettes 31 May 2016 | 2:45 pm

    Plain packaging laws came into effect earlier this month in England and France, requiring cigarette boxes to be unbranded and carry health warningsNew Zealand and Norway became on Tuesday the latest countries to announce they will remove branding from cigarette packets, in a move hailed by the WHO as an effective way to cut smoking rates. The news came the same day as WHO unveiled a report saying the drab packets plastered with warnings and gruesome pictures helped shrink the number of smokers in Australia, the first nation to impose such measures. "Plans by New Zealand and Norway to introduce plain packaging to reduce demand for tobacco send a powerful signal that this initiative works," Oleg Chestnov, the World Health Organization Assistant Director-General for noncommunicable diseases told AFP in an email.


The fastest and best way to sell real estate.
auction-style-property-sale