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  Tuesday, May 31, 2016  Home > Body-Mind-Spirit > Health & Wellness
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The Meaning Of The Dancing Butterfly

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We babysat for her.  By “we”, I mean my wife and I before we had a child.  By “babysat” I mean a valuable service occasionally performed for frazzled, young parent-friends like Beth and T.K..  By “her” I mean their 3 month old daughter Summers. That parti…
 

Showing Teeth...


Can Emotion Be Taught??? Can you teach someone to feel?  Is it a “Heart-Felt Smile” or are we just “Showing Teeth”? “Smile Sweetie…please smile…”, I would plead to my little boy, before his Granny would come for a visit.  The result was always the same…a very sti…
 

'Food Matters': A movie that could save your life

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  Between 1977 and 2002, the percent of the American population eating three or more snacks a day -- and most of it junk food -- increased to 42 percent from 11 percent. Further, researchers found, the percent of children surveyed who said they had eaten th…
 

Stress linked to cancer

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Scientists have discovered that everyday emotional stress is a trigger for the growth of tumors. Any sort of trauma, emotional or physical, can act as a "pathway" between cancerous mutations, bringing them together in a potentially deadly mix. The findings seem to show for …
 

How to, 'Let food be your medicine'

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Dr. Keith Scott has dedicated years of research into the efficacy of natural spices for promoting physical, mental and emotional health. The cure for most health related issues is indeed, ‘In the cupboard’.  Dr. Scott’s website gives examples of herbs and spices for the…
 

Tricking you into consuming GMO and toxic food.


How would you feel about being tricked into consuming genetically modified, roundup herbicide soaked food? How would you feel if Whole Foods Market were assisting a huge agribusiness to make this happen? This is exactly what is going on with the Silk line of soy milk produ…
 

Interview with Dr. Andrew Weil

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Kevin Rose interviews the popular alternative health professional, Dr. Andrew Weil. In this interview Kevin, infamous for having made $60 million in 18 months through Digg.com (as captioned on the cover of August 14, 2006 edition of Business Week), brings an assortment of he…
 

Is a Day at The Beach really...A Day at The Beach for Autism Spectrum???

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Happiness is:   “A Day at the Beach”… or is it???  Ahh…the life of a child…So wistfully happy, and ultimately carefree.  With not a care in the world, a child is free…free from life’s stresses, and so it is, and so it should be the best time of life.&nbs…
 

Michael Pollan On Oprah


Recently, Michael Pollan was on the Oprah Show. (Watch it here.) What does this mean? Has "real food" hit the mainstream? Maybe. At the very least, Michael Pollan's flavor of common-sense, easy-to-understand real food philosophy moves to a more mainstream audience. And he c…
 

The yogic art of "ocean breathing"

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The classic name for the technique is Ujjayi Pranayama. It is called the great breath or victory breath, I've never actually heard anyone call it "Darth vader" breath, but it has been called that! When I first started practising it at the end of yoga classes, I'd never hear…
 

Ten Helpful Hints...


I have a tattered little piece of paper that decorates my fridge, and it's nothing fancy...really quite worn...but on it is written some of the best advice that I have ever given myself.  It is called "10 Helpful Hints".  The reason I keep it on my "fridge" is so t…
 

Jeffrey Smith: GMO's and Weston A. Price presentation video


Jeffrey Smith, author of ‘Seeds of Deception’ and ‘Genetic Roulette’, reminds us in his Huffington Post article, Rude Awakening, that we must be the champions of our own health. In this article Jeffrey illustrates that our collective ignorance is as much the enemy as genetic…
 

New scientific study confirms that spices have the highest antioxidant content of all foods


A recently published research paper proves yet again that culinary herbs and spices have the highest antioxidant content of all food groups. Published in the January 2010 edition of the Nutrition Journal, the multinational authors of the study analyzed over 3000 different fo…
 

How to Reduce Your Risk of Cancer By 50%

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I have some vital information for you that can literally save your life, save you from dying from cancer; not just from getting cancer, but from dying from it. I came across this absolutely vital information while researching my new book called, Dark Deception, info which is…
 

Eleven Ways to Think Outside the Box

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Thinking outside the box is more than just a business cliché. It means approaching problems in new, innovative ways and conceptualizing problems differently. Here are 11 ways to beef up your out-of-the-box thinking skills. 1. Study another industry Go to the library and pi…
 
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  • Nestle, on health kick, moves into milk allergy testing 31 May 2016 | 12:08 am

    A Nestle logo is pictured on sample products on display at the company headquarters in VeveyNestle, the world's biggest food company, is stepping up its push into medicine with a global deal worth up to 100 million euros ($111 million) to develop and market an experimental milk allergy test for infants. The Swiss group will pay DBV Technologies 10 million euros upfront for rights to its skin patch test for cow’s milk protein allergy, with the balance depending on successful development, the two companies said on Tuesday. The deal with the Franco-American company underscores Nestle's ambitions for its Health Science division, which it believes could eventually generate more than 10 billion Swiss francs ($10 billion) in annual sales.


  • 5 Times Nurses Made Their Patients Forget They Were In A Hospital 30 May 2016 | 11:01 pm

    5 Times Nurses Made Their Patients Forget They Were In A HospitalNurses: the unsung heroes of the hospital. While doctors hurry through the halls, sweeping from one room to the next, nurses are the more constant presence; they often sit with patients long after everyone else has gone home. They become a patient’s family when real relatives are not around, and often find themselves providing compassionate...


  • Extreme weather increasing level of toxins in food, scientists warn 30 May 2016 | 11:00 pm

    Illustration photo of slices of cucumber and a tomato sliceBy Kagondu Njagi NAIROBI (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - As they struggle to deal with more extreme weather, a range of food crops are generating more of chemical compounds that can cause health problems for people and livestock who eat them, scientists have warned. A new report by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) says that crops such as wheat and maize are generating more potential toxins as a reaction to protect themselves from extreme weather.


  • Alibaba tells vendors to halt drug sales online, cites government rule change 30 May 2016 | 10:28 pm

    An employee is seen behind a glass wall with the logo of Alibaba at the company's headquarters on the outskirts of Hangzhou, Zhejiang provinceChinese e-commerce firm Alibaba Group Holding Ltd has told vendors on its Tmall website to stop selling medicine, saying a local regulator has issued an "urgent" directive halting drug sales via third-party platforms. Alibaba, in a notice dated May 27 seen by Reuters, cited a circular from the Hebei province branch of the China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) on "urgent control measures relating to drug products". The regulator's surprise directive comes as the government promotes retail sales of over-the-counter (OTC) medicine, with a pledge to harness technology to solve issues as varied as high drug prices and snarling hospital queues.


  • New Zealand backs plain packaging for cigarettes 30 May 2016 | 9:18 pm

    New Zealand will introduce plain packaging on tobacco products, selling them in drab boxes plastered with health warnings and gruesome pictures of smoking-related diseaseNew Zealand said Tuesday it will introduce plain packaging on tobacco products, joining a growing list of countries planning similar measures despite the threat of legal action from the industry. The move, which coincides with World No Tobacco Day, means cigarettes must be sold in drab boxes plastered with health warnings and gruesome pictures of smoking-related disease. Associate Health Minister Sam Lotu-Iiga said the measure targeted one of the most powerful tools used to get young people hooked on tobacco.


  • Kidnapped Mexican striker Pulido escaped by punching captor: official 30 May 2016 | 5:49 pm

    Mexico's striker Alan Pulido is seen next to Tamaulipas State Governor Egidio Torre Cantu after Pulido has been rescued within a day in Ciudad VictoriaBy Natalie Ann Schachar MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - The authorities billed it as a rescue, but Mexican soccer player Alan Pulido escaped his kidnappers by punching the one guarding him, snatching a cellphone and calling for help, a top official in the country's violent northeast said on Monday. State security forces located Pulido within minutes of his call from a safe house in the restive city of Ciudad Victoria in Tamaulipas state, as they were scouring the area nearby, state prosecutor Ismael Quintanilla told local radio. The 25-year-old Mexico national team striker who also plays professionally with the Greek team Olympiakos disappeared in his hometown on Saturday night, when he was intercepted by gunmen after leaving a party with his girlfriend.


  • After a heart attack, people more likely to take statins as directed 30 May 2016 | 4:32 pm

    By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Heath) - People may do a better job of following doctors' orders to take statin drugs - prescribed to protect against cardiac problems - after they wind up hospitalized for a heart attack, a large study suggests. "Our theory is that the heart attack hospitalization appeared to serve as a teachable moment, or a wake-up call, to patients to do everything possible to prevent another heart attack," lead study author Dr. Ian Kronish of Columbia University Medical Center said by email. Millions of people worldwide take statins to help reduce their blood levels of low-density lipoprotein, or LDL, cholesterol – the bad kind that builds up in blood vessels, damages artery walls and can lead to clots and heart attacks.

  • Chile's red tide outbreak recedes, giving fishermen a break 30 May 2016 | 4:23 pm

    By Anthony Esposito SANTIAGO (Reuters) - An unusually widespread and deadly "red tide" outbreak in southern Chile's fishing-rich waters is abating, a top scientist said on Monday, giving some reprieve to communities that depend on the Pacific Ocean for their livelihoods. The red tide - an algal bloom that turns the sea water red and makes seafood toxic - is a common, naturally recurring phenomenon in southern Chile. "From the first analysis of the samples taken from the ocean around Chiloe island, we can conclude that the red tide phenomenon is receding," University of Concepcion investigator Laura Farias told reporters on a conference call.

  • Health officials now confirm 11 cases of measles in Arizona 30 May 2016 | 4:08 pm

    ELOY, Ariz. (AP) — An outbreak of measles that began with an inmate at a federal detention center for immigrants in central Arizona has now grown to 11 confirmed cases, officials said Monday.

  • Delaying Rio Games would give 'false security' on Zika: WHO panel head 30 May 2016 | 4:02 pm

    A Brazilian Army soldier shows pamphlets during the National Day of Mobilization Zika Zero in Rio de JaneiroBy Stephanie Nebehay GENEVA (Reuters) - Postponing the Rio Olympics due to fears that the event could speed the spread of the Zika virus would give a "false" sense of security because travelers are constantly going in and out of Brazil, the head of the World Health Organization's emergency committee said. More than 100 medical experts and scientists called last Friday for the Rio Games to be postponed or moved due to fears over the spread of the virus, which is linked to serious birth defects.. The WHO rejected their call. Extensive travel in a globalized world is the issue, not the Games that start on August 5, said David Heymann, chair of the Health Protection Agency in Britain who also leads the WHO panel of independent experts on Zika.